What is That in Your Eye?

Tim BrusterFriends,

In Sanctuary worship this Sunday I am continuing my series “Questions We Should Answer” with another challenging question: What is that in your eye? It is a question about the way you see yourself and others and the way you judge yourself and others. It is a question about self-awareness and grace toward yourself and others. The question comes from this teaching of Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount:

Don’t judge, so that you won’t be judged. You’ll receive the same judgment you give. Whatever you deal out will be dealt out to you. Why do you see the splinter that’s in your brother’s or sister’s eye, but don’t notice the log in your own eye? How can you say to your brother or sister, “Let me take the splinter out of your eye,” when there’s a log in your eye? You deceive yourself! First take the log out of your eye, and then you’ll see clearly to take the splinter out of your brother’s or sister’s eye. (Matthew 7:1-5)

This is a big one! Jesus was confronting his own disciples and confronts us with the truth that we tend to be blind to our own faults and see too clearly the faults of others. We tend to leave our own motives unquestioned and question the motives of others. We can be self-unaware to the extent that we can ascribe selfish motives, destructive behavior, and flawed character traits to others while being blind to the same kinds of selfish motives, destructive behavior, and flawed character traits in ourselves.

As Jesus says clearly, “Don’t judge,” he asks two questions. One points to motive: “Why do you see the splinter that’s in your brother’s or sister’s eye, but don’t notice the log in your own eye?” The other points to behavior: “How can you say to your brother or sister, ‘Let me take the splinter out of your eye,’ when there’s a log in your eye?” Then he says, pointedly, “You deceive yourself!”

So, what do you do? Jesus says, “First take the log out of your eye, and then you’ll see clearly to take the splinter out of your brother’s or sister’s eye.” First, become self-aware, realize your own faults, and seek to make them right. Only then can you see your brother or sister clearly and compassionately in order to help him or her.

I look forward to being in worship with you on Sunday as we take a look at this teaching of Jesus and use it as a lens to look at ourselves and our relationships with others — all in the light of Christ’s love.

Grace and Peace,

Tim_Signature

 

 

Dr. Tim Bruster
Senior Pastor

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