Tim’s Daily Bread Devotional 4.6.21

By April 6, 2021Daily Bread

I invite you to take a few moments with me to reflect on today’s Upper Room Devotional below.

Thank you for sharing this early moment of your day with me, with God, and with the thoughts and words of this reading that I hope you will carry with you throughout the coming day and night.

Today’s Scripture:

Psalm 51:13-17 New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)

13 Then I will teach transgressors your ways,
and sinners will return to you.
14 Deliver me from bloodshed, O God,
O God of my salvation,
and my tongue will sing aloud of your deliverance.

15 O Lord, open my lips,
and my mouth will declare your praise.
16 For you have no delight in sacrifice;
if I were to give a burnt offering, you would not be pleased.
17 The sacrifice acceptable to God[a] is a broken spirit;
a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.

Tim’s Devotional Reflection for Today

One of the central scripture readings in the season of Lent is the 51st Psalm.  Part of that psalm reads, “Create in me a clean heart, O God, and put a new and right spirit within me.”  The psalm not only expresses the commitment to be different but the need for God to enable that to happen.  Change is not only an act of pure will, but it is also the creative power of God.

The heading of Psalm 51 is “A Psalm of David, when the prophet Nathan came to him, after he had gone in to Bathsheba.”  David had not only committed the sin of adultery, but he had  Bathsheba’s husband killed to cover it up.  Psalm 51 is a prayer for cleansing and pardon.

We are past the season of Lent now and into the Easter season, celebrating new life and hope and new commitments to live as Christ calls us to live.  The sacrifice of burnt offerings are not what God desires, says the psalmist, but “the sacrifice acceptable to God is a “broken spirit” – a broken and contrite heart.”

God desires a broken spirit and a broken heart?  What could that possibly mean?  It doesn’t mean that God wants our hearts or our spirits broken in the sense of punishment or “getting what we deserve.”  It doesn’t mean that God delights in our pain.  Rather, a broken heart or spirit is broken open.  It is that openness to God and to others that leads to accepting God’s forgiveness, being open to change, and open to forgive as we have been forgiven.

There is a lot of theology woven in to hymns. To enhance today’s reading, I recommend listening to “Have Thine Own Way, Lord”. I hope you will take a few moments to let the words of this message and the emotion that always connects us to music connect with your soul. Listen to this hymn on SoundCloud.

Thank you for sharing this early moment of your day with me, with God, and with the words and music that I hope you will carry with you throughout the coming day and night.

I am so grateful for you, for our church, and for the Love that will see us all through this very difficult time. Please stay safe and well and we’ll be together again in spirit tomorrow morning!

Grace and Peace,


Dr. Tim Bruster
Senior Pastor

Here’s more about this passage of scripture via Upper Room devotionals:

GOD RESTORES

God’s love can restore anyone.

read more  SIGN UP TO RECEIVE DEVOTIONAL VIA EMAIL

“Have Thine Own Way, Lord”

Have Thine own way Lord
Have Thine own way
Thou art the potter I am the clay
Mold me and make me after Thy will
While I am waiting yielded and still

Have Thine own way Lord
Have Thine own way
Search me and try me Master today
Whiter than snow Lord wash me just now
As in Thy presence humbly I bow

Have Thine own way Lord
Have Thine own way
Hold over my being absolute sway
Filled with Thy spirit till all can see
Christ only always living in me

SUBSCRIBE TO NEWS

Subscribe to E-News

Subscribe to Newsletter Footer